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Dating Coach Uk

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They had gone out for four years, but Ed had refused to discuss the idea of living together. Fearing he would never commit, Hannah broke up with him, yet struggled to get over the split.

But when she heard about his engagement, the year-old graphic designer knew she had to move on. She tried Tinder, and went on a couple of awkward dates with the colleague of a friend, but it never felt right. Then she heard about a dating coach — an expert who she hoped could help her find someone new.

These days, anyone who is serious about finding and staying with a partner has a coach. They not only guide you through the world of apps, they also help you overcome issues that might be holding you back, from a lack of confidence to a fear of intimacy. A modern coach is more like a therapist. Like therapy, coaching uses the past, but it also looks to the future. Many offer Skype sessions, too. Under the surface, the coach is directing the conversation, trying to find out why you are having difficulties.

Sessions tend to be weekly or fortnightly, and you may well be given homework perhaps an exercise such as striking up a conversation with a stranger you like the look of at an event, or keeping a diary about an ongoing problem such as your relationship with your parents or getting over an ex. Charly Lester, founder of the UK Dating Awards, has seen a substantial rise in new coaches being shortlisted, while Auret and other coaches Jo Hemmings and Madeleine Mason have all noticed greater demand for their expertise.

Mason and Hemmings are also psychologists, although anyone can market themselves as a coach. Hemmings has many clients in their 30s. Some have been concentrating on their careers, others are looking for relationship guidance.

Their friends may think meeting the right person is a matter of time, but they fear it will never happen. Given that CBT is often used for serious conditions, from depression to OCD, it might sound extreme to use it for dating. Yet there are reasons why people are doing so. Jenna, a year-old literary agent, had been single for four years. It was disheartening.

People get fed up and stop dating altogether. Hemmings suggests joining two apps at most perhaps Bumble, where women have to approach men, and Happn, which prioritises potential matches based on how many times you cross paths with them and spend just half an hour a day scrolling through people. And a dating coach will show you how to get an edge. She might also advise you to lower your expectations. Apps can give you the impression that there are any number of men out there and that you will meet someone who fulfils all your criteria — looks included.

A friend took new pictures of me and I got more attention. They have often gone on a few awkward dates and want to know how to make them run more smoothly. Experts say we now spend so much time online that meeting people in person feels daunting. As for flirting, forget it. Natasha, 31, a recruitment consultant, says: My coach asked me more about the dates and I realised I was so anxious that I would chat away and never let the man speak.

I was scared that if there was a gap they would think I was boring. Introduce momentum. Talk about family or past relationships. A fear of intimacy often goes deep and can sometimes be traced to your relationship with a parent or a past boyfriend. I ended the relationship for a reason. I needed guidance about what to do next. Auret says: Sam, her last boyfriend, had cheated on her a week after they moved in together. Now, a year later, she thought she had moved on. The future had looked promising with James: Was she scared of getting too close in case James was also unfaithful?

By talking it through with my coach, I realised there was no connection between Sam and James — and no reason why a betrayal should happen again.

I called James to apologise and he was amazingly understanding. But I recognise the signs and can stop myself running away. She believes the impact of our families is also underestimated. Lots of people struggle with that. I saw relationships as selfish. Every time I was in one I worried I might eventually behave like that myself and would try to get out of it.

I never connected the two until I saw a coach. I still resented them for the way they brought me up and felt distant from them because we had never talked about it. I flew out to see them and explained how I had felt as a child. It was hard for all of us to be honest, but they admitted they wished that they had been around more. And many women, like Hannah, experiment with dating or try to get over a break-up without any guidance because they feel they are expected to solve the problem alone.

But the help is out there. Her last relationship ended because she and her boyfriend realised they were just going out with each other so they had someone to accompany them to weddings. I was sociable, I went swing-dancing several times a week.

Settling down had always sounded conventional, I thought. It was only recently, at 36, and with most of my friends in couples, that I had started wanting to meet someone.

Rarely, I admitted, because no one appealed. Had I tried to meet commuters on the train? I lived in Brighton and worked in London. No, I replied; I preferred to snooze. What about dancing? We spoke about potential reasons: A love of independence? I suggested. We talked about my family my parents, I should add, are happily married before discussing past relationships. Could I be worried that someone else might leave me if we became close? Jo was extremely perceptive.

Perhaps you are instinctively veering towardsa safer, more conventional option, and therefore simply not feeling the connection. You might need to be a little bolder. I rarely talk about relationships with friends because I am better at listening than sharing how I feel. Jo said I might benefit from more sessions if I really wanted to uncover what was going on and move forward, and I am thinking about it.

I have recently given my number to a couple of possible dates at parties — quite willingly — and am actually looking forward to seeing them.

Dating Coach Service World Class Dating Coach

Today, Christina is a gentle yet determined, independent woman who has successfully created her own version of living an enriched and inspiring life. Having worked as a professional Matchmaker at a luxury matchmaking agency for High Net Worth Individuals, coached many couples over the years, and trained in relationship and couples coaching certification, she provides a one stop shop for relationship issues that everyone faces at some point in life. Learn More LIFE COACHING Having trained in transformational and personal life coaching, specialising in aspects across management, leading change and emotional intelligence, Christina also offers powerful and unique coaching packages to activate the change you desire.

She has been invaluable in coaching some clients deal with the aftermath of crisis. She has a very impressive analytical brain and a rare talent for listening with clarity. She is always very thoughtful in her interpretation of an issue and how to best deal with it. She is very knowledgeable in her space and exceptionally well informed. I would recommend her services to anyone who is looking for a more mindful way of getting the most out of the time we have in this life.

We could feel that she has got great experience and deep understanding of the matter. It was a paradigm shift for me. She is very patient and knowledgeable, and I look forward to our next session. I would highly recommend her. Christina has given me the clarity to see what my real goal are in the haze of everyday issues and challenges.

As for flirting, forget it. Natasha, 31, a recruitment consultant, says: My coach asked me more about the dates and I realised I was so anxious that I would chat away and never let the man speak. I was scared that if there was a gap they would think I was boring. Introduce momentum. Talk about family or past relationships. A fear of intimacy often goes deep and can sometimes be traced to your relationship with a parent or a past boyfriend.

I ended the relationship for a reason. I needed guidance about what to do next. Auret says: Sam, her last boyfriend, had cheated on her a week after they moved in together. Now, a year later, she thought she had moved on. The future had looked promising with James: Was she scared of getting too close in case James was also unfaithful? By talking it through with my coach, I realised there was no connection between Sam and James — and no reason why a betrayal should happen again.

I called James to apologise and he was amazingly understanding. But I recognise the signs and can stop myself running away. She believes the impact of our families is also underestimated. Lots of people struggle with that. I saw relationships as selfish. Every time I was in one I worried I might eventually behave like that myself and would try to get out of it. I never connected the two until I saw a coach. I still resented them for the way they brought me up and felt distant from them because we had never talked about it.

I flew out to see them and explained how I had felt as a child. It was hard for all of us to be honest, but they admitted they wished that they had been around more. And many women, like Hannah, experiment with dating or try to get over a break-up without any guidance because they feel they are expected to solve the problem alone. But the help is out there. Her last relationship ended because she and her boyfriend realised they were just going out with each other so they had someone to accompany them to weddings.

I was sociable, I went swing-dancing several times a week. Settling down had always sounded conventional, I thought. It was only recently, at 36, and with most of my friends in couples, that I had started wanting to meet someone. Rarely, I admitted, because no one appealed. Had I tried to meet commuters on the train? I lived in Brighton and worked in London. No, I replied; I preferred to snooze.

What about dancing? We spoke about potential reasons: A love of independence?

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