Epiphone Sheraton Dating And Information: anchorrestaurantsupply.com

Epiphone Sheraton Dating And Information

epiphone sheraton dating and information

Olympic Special electric solidbody Introduction: Epiphone was a family business established in as "the House of Stathopoulo" by Anastasios Stathopoulo, a greek violin maker. In they incorporated and at this time made mostly high quality and fancy banjos. In the name was changed to "Epiphone" after Epi Stathopoulo, president of the company and one of the founder's sons. In the 's, the company changed its emphasis to guitars.

Epiphone was the only banjo company to successfully switch to guitar production. Conn Company's a band instrument manufacturer Orphie got Epiphone distribution rights moved. Now most guitar production went to Philidelphia although the labels still said New York.

This was done partially as a "strike break" move, as New York Epiphone workers were in conflict with the Stathopoulio family. The Stathopoulo family regained control again in , but few if any instruments were made in and When CMI purchased Epiphone, they got all of Epiphone's current stock of parts including bodies, necks, pickups, etc.

Gibson used these "New Yorker" parts in conjuction with their own parts when making Epiphones from to By Gibson has used up all the original New York-made Epiphone parts, and then used Gibson parts made in Kalamazoo. Later, productions was moved to Korea. Many of the imported instruments bear a label with Gibson's Kalamazoo address and no mention of Japan or Korea, which can be misleading.

However, these import instruments have model numbers that do not correspond with Kalamazoo made Epiphone model numbers listed below. Also the serial number is usually 7 digits or longer unlike U. Back to the Table of Contents Model Types. In addition to the Zephyr and Zephyr Regent models, Epiphone applied the two terms to other models to signify electric or cutaway: Contruction and Value. High-end acoustic archtop Epiphones are constructed of high quality, solid woods.

Electric archtop Epiphones are made from laminated woods. Because of this, electric archtop Epiphones are much less desirable, and are worth considerably less than fully acoustic archtop models. Pre Epiphones are of very high quality and are generally much scarcer than later models. They have a smaller body and less modern neck feel than later models, and are less collectable.

The most collectable models are those made from when body sizes were increased, up to the end of New York productions Most desirable are the professional grade models on which the company built its reputation: Emperor, DeLuxe, Broadway and Triumph. These models, along with Gibsons, are considered by most to be the best vintage factory-made archtop guitars produced. Mid-range and low-end models are generally regarded as student model instruments. Electric Archtop Epiphones.

New York-made electric archtops are interesting but generally are not as collectable as equivalent acoustic models. Acoustic models are solid carved top and back whereas electrics are plywood. In addition, the electronics on New York Epiphones are not as sonically good as compared to Gibson of the same period or to the later Gibson-made Epiphones. Therefore, New York electric archtop Epiphones are worth considerably less than Gibsons of the same period. Most hollowbody Epiphone electrics bring less than the equivalent Gibson models.

Double cutaway thinbody electrics are the most highly sought after electric archtop models. The Emperor single cutaway is the rarest of the thinlines 66 made. The Sheraton, especially the early version with blond finish, is also very collectable.

Sheratons with New York pickups are worth the most, but not for sound. The Riviera, though equal in playability and sound, is not nearly as collectable. The Casino is collectable only because John Lennon played one. It may seem like a contridiction in terms: New York pickups are sonically inferior to Gibson pickups, but models fitted with New York pickups from to are worth more than post models fitted with better Gibson pickups.

These Epiphone models made from to like the Sheraton and Coronet are much more collectable and valuable with New York pickups, even though everyone agrees the later models sound much better fitted with Gibson pickups.

Solidbody Electric Epiphones. Solidbody electric Epiphones with New York pickups are interesting to collectors, but not for their sound. Later solidbody models with mini- humbucking pickups bring less money than Gibson equivalents with standard humbucking pickups. None are especially valuable, although Epiphone workmanship and playability is equivalent to Gibson of the same period.

Letters preceding model number: Letters after model number: Information here for completeness. Model number listed on a blue label with a Kalamazoo address, but usually say "Made in Japan" at the bottom edge of the label.

Epiphone Sheraton-II

Epi Stathopoulos died in Control of the company went to his brothers, Orphie and Frixo. In , a four-month-long strike forced a relocation of Epiphone from New York to Philadelphia.

The company was bought out by their main rival, Gibson in In , Gibson began to expand upon its Epiphone line of semi-hollow guitars. They reworked Epiphone's old Century archtop into a thinline electric fitted with a single P This was followed by the introduction of a twin-pickup, double-cut thinline semi-hollowbody, the Sheraton.

The original Gibson-made Epiphone Sheratons were up until , when production moved to Japan, and major design changes began to occur. It featured the same double rounded horns, and had similarly placed electronics. The Sheraton was fitted with a set glued-in neck, in accordance with Gibson's standard practice.

Distinguishing characteristics of the Sheraton included its multiple body binding like that of its top of the line Gibson cousin, the ES ; its Frequensator tail piece; and its headstock and fretboard inlays. Unlike any of the semi-hollowbodies in the Gibson line, the Sheraton's headstock featured Epiphone's traditional fancy vine or "tree of life" inlay on its headstock, while its fretboard featured a block and triangle or "V" inlay of mother-of-pearl and abalone, as well as binding on the fretboard's surface, inset slightly from the outer edges.

Parts begin to change to Gibson-made parts. The pickups are changed from the New York single coils to mini-humbuckers, knobs become gold gibson bonnet knobs, tuners become Grovers.

Because of this, electric archtop Epiphones are much less desirable, and are worth considerably less than fully acoustic archtop models. Pre Epiphones are of very high quality and are generally much scarcer than later models. They have a smaller body and less modern neck feel than later models, and are less collectable. The most collectable models are those made from when body sizes were increased, up to the end of New York productions Most desirable are the professional grade models on which the company built its reputation: Emperor, DeLuxe, Broadway and Triumph.

These models, along with Gibsons, are considered by most to be the best vintage factory-made archtop guitars produced. Mid-range and low-end models are generally regarded as student model instruments. Electric Archtop Epiphones. New York-made electric archtops are interesting but generally are not as collectable as equivalent acoustic models.

Acoustic models are solid carved top and back whereas electrics are plywood. In addition, the electronics on New York Epiphones are not as sonically good as compared to Gibson of the same period or to the later Gibson-made Epiphones. Therefore, New York electric archtop Epiphones are worth considerably less than Gibsons of the same period.

Most hollowbody Epiphone electrics bring less than the equivalent Gibson models. Double cutaway thinbody electrics are the most highly sought after electric archtop models. The Emperor single cutaway is the rarest of the thinlines 66 made.

The Sheraton, especially the early version with blond finish, is also very collectable. Sheratons with New York pickups are worth the most, but not for sound. The Riviera, though equal in playability and sound, is not nearly as collectable. The Casino is collectable only because John Lennon played one. It may seem like a contridiction in terms: New York pickups are sonically inferior to Gibson pickups, but models fitted with New York pickups from to are worth more than post models fitted with better Gibson pickups.

These Epiphone models made from to like the Sheraton and Coronet are much more collectable and valuable with New York pickups, even though everyone agrees the later models sound much better fitted with Gibson pickups.

Solidbody Electric Epiphones. Solidbody electric Epiphones with New York pickups are interesting to collectors, but not for their sound. Later solidbody models with mini- humbucking pickups bring less money than Gibson equivalents with standard humbucking pickups.

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