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Radio reports on conditions first on scene, CAN reports, follow-up reports, etc. SOP Alignment: Something may sound great on paper or in your mind, but once you get started, it may not play out exactly as you expected. Simulations should last anywhere from 30 seconds to 30 minutes depending on the number of skills you want to evaluate. Anything longer than 30 minutes in one sitting will probably be too taxing for all parties involved. Immediate-Need Challenges: Properly run simulations can provide as much or as little stress for the student as you want.

Examples of immediate-need challenges include: All of these challenges are meant not only to add some real-life stress, but also to actually evaluate how the individual and their respective crews would manage such scenarios.

Simulations allow students to practice different roles to see how that changes their responsibilities on the fireground. Anyone can try their hand at being the first-arriving company officer or chief officer. You can determine if you want someone to be an engine, ladder or rescue company officer. Additionally, are you going to have one person use the simulator at a time or do you want multiple candidates operating simultaneously, each playing a different role?

Look for simulation packages that offer you the ability to simultaneously evaluate multiple roles, including firefighters, engineers, company officers and even chief officers. In my opinion, simulations that only allow one person typically the first-arriving officer as the IC to participate are missing the mark.

Simulations can be very effective for getting new officers comfortable with documentation and evaluating the use of department documentation. Possibilities include tactical worksheets, incident command forms or white board systems used on command vehicles.

Follow-up Questions: After the simulation is finished, consider asking the students some follow-up questions: What if anything would you do differently? Did you have enough resources on scene? Why did you do this or that a chance for the individual to defend or justify what they did or did not do?

Describe to us your objectives, your strategy, your tactics, your ICS structure, etc. Simulation Termination: A properly designed simulation would not be complete without a proper debriefing session that allows all participants the opportunity to state what they did, what they would do differently, what they felt went well, etc. It should also allow for feedback from the instructors as to what they felt went well and what could have been done differently.

Final Thoughts Simulations have been proven by the airline industry to successfully prepare pilots for the challenges they may face in the sky. It only seems appropriate, then, that similar programs would offer considerable benefits to the fire service. When effective objectives are created and applied in simulations, fire service personnel can offer standardized and consistent training, while improving decision-making skills and providing measurable outcomes.

In sum, simulations that can evaluate various ranks of personnel at the appropriate levels strategic, tactical or task are valuable training tools that can be used over and over again. The author has reported no conflicts of interest with the sponsor of this supplement. Steve Prziborowski Steve Prziborowski has more than 20 years of fire service experience, currently serving as the deputy chief of training for the Santa Clara County Fire Department in Los Gatos, Calif.

He is also a regular presenter at fire service events across the country, and has authored numerous articles in all of the major fire service publications. Sponsored Content is made possible by our sponsor; it does not necessarily reflect the views of our editorial staff. Related Articles.

Online Incident Command Simulator

Look for simulation packages that offer you the ability to simultaneously evaluate multiple roles, including firefighters, engineers, company officers and even chief officers. In my opinion, simulations that only allow one person typically the first-arriving officer as the IC to participate are missing the mark. Simulations can be very effective for getting new officers comfortable with documentation and evaluating the use of department documentation.

Possibilities include tactical worksheets, incident command forms or white board systems used on command vehicles. Follow-up Questions: After the simulation is finished, consider asking the students some follow-up questions: What if anything would you do differently? Did you have enough resources on scene? Why did you do this or that a chance for the individual to defend or justify what they did or did not do? Describe to us your objectives, your strategy, your tactics, your ICS structure, etc.

Simulation Termination: A properly designed simulation would not be complete without a proper debriefing session that allows all participants the opportunity to state what they did, what they would do differently, what they felt went well, etc.

It should also allow for feedback from the instructors as to what they felt went well and what could have been done differently. Final Thoughts Simulations have been proven by the airline industry to successfully prepare pilots for the challenges they may face in the sky.

It only seems appropriate, then, that similar programs would offer considerable benefits to the fire service. When effective objectives are created and applied in simulations, fire service personnel can offer standardized and consistent training, while improving decision-making skills and providing measurable outcomes. In sum, simulations that can evaluate various ranks of personnel at the appropriate levels strategic, tactical or task are valuable training tools that can be used over and over again.

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Flexible explosion test facility The offshore module test rig provides a flexible explosion test facility for studying both gas accumulation and explosions in a geometry representative of a full scale offshore module. The rig is 28m long, 12m wide and 8m high. Extensively instrumented explosions All explosions can be extensively instrumented to measure; Overpressure using transducers recorded on high speed data acquisition systems Flame arrival times Response of structure to explosion loading using strain gauges, displacement transducers or accelerometers- Explosion chamber The explosion chamber is 4.

With a flexible vent opening in the front face and varying levels of pipework congestion inside, this chamber can be used to provide overpressure pulses with peaks from 60mbar to 4 bar and durations from 50msec to over msec. With this level of flexibility, the chamber is well suited for testing the performance of blast resistant equipment and structures such as doors, fire walls, panels, passive fire protection etc.

The chamber is also ideal for studying mitigation systems, such as water deluge at a representative scale. Contact us:

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